Energy storage news: 23.07.14

Researchers at Rutgers have developed a catalyst based on carbon nanotubes that could replace platinum in hydrogen fuel production from water.

Researchers at Rutgers have developed a catalyst based on carbon nanotubes that could replace platinum in hydrogen fuel production from water. Photo credit: Tewodros Asefa

This week’s energy storage news headlines from our Twitter feed.

  • The Society of Automotive Engineers has finalised a new hydrogen fueling standard for light-duty vehicles: SAE J2601.
  • As Poland debates new renewable energy legislation, a Polish Energy Storage Association is being formed, in order to promote the importance of energy storage legislation.

  • A new ‘exfoliation’ or peeling technology for metal-oxide catalysts used in the splitting of water to create hydrogen has been developed by scientists at EPFL.
  • Mercedes has released details about its upcoming C350 hybrid electric car, which will mainly be targeted at China and North America.
  • Aquion Energy, the solar energy storage company, has given Gigaom a tour of its new battery factory.
  • Con Edison is proposing the Brooklyn/Queens Demand Management Program – a combination of energy storage, microgrids and efficiency measures – in order to delay having to build a new USD$1bn substation in New York.
  • Electric vehicle owners use four times more electricity at night than average consumers, according to research from Outlier.
  • Navigant Research says that neighbourhood electric vehicles – golf-cart style, with short range and low speed – are the most popular form of electric vehicle in the world.
  • Dragonfly Energy, of Nevada, is looking for funding to develop its lithium-ion battery production and is interested in talking to Tesla.
  • Energy storage scientists looking to exhibit their research talents are being invited to post information for free on the Linknovate platform.

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