Britain bets on graphene

Discovered by scientists at Manchester University in 2005, graphene has a wealth of potential applications related to both renewables and energy storage – as well as flexible electronics and opto-electronics, and much more.

It is also having a lot of UK government money thrown at it, according to the BBC. The UKP 21.5 million promised by British finance minister George Osborne will come from an earlier funding allocation, and – it is hoped – will be matched by another UKP 14 million from industry and universities.

Amongst the commercial partners will be  Nokia, BAE Systems, Procter & Gamble, Qinetiq, Rolls-Royce, Dyson, Sharp and Philips Research.

Saft in new US$98m deal with US military

Saft will be providing the US Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) with lithium-sulphur dioxide batteries for portable devices such as radios,reports New Energy Network. The DLA will then pass the units onto the US Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines.

The contract Saft has secured will be worth up to USD$98 million over five years and adds to the recent top-up of $1.3 million the company secured from BAE Systems to develop energy storage solutions for hybrid vehicles destined for the US Army.

US military vehicles go electric

It is not just tree-huggers who are embracing electric vehicles: the US Army has several in the pipeline. This means opportunities for energy storage companies, such as Saft, which has just been awarded USD$1.3 million from weapons manufacturer BAE Systems.

The funding is for the continued development of a Lithium-ion energy storage system for the US Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle programme. Saft, which is designing and building ultra-high-power cells for the vehicle’s hybrid electric drive system, has already completed the demo battery system including hardware and software, says the company.