Energy storage news: 23.07.14

Researchers at Rutgers have developed a catalyst based on carbon nanotubes that could replace platinum in hydrogen fuel production from water.

Researchers at Rutgers have developed a catalyst based on carbon nanotubes that could replace platinum in hydrogen fuel production from water. Photo credit: Tewodros Asefa

This week’s energy storage news headlines from our Twitter feed.

  • The Society of Automotive Engineers has finalised a new hydrogen fueling standard for light-duty vehicles: SAE J2601.
  • As Poland debates new renewable energy legislation, a Polish Energy Storage Association is being formed, in order to promote the importance of energy storage legislation.

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A cheap substitute for platinum?

Scanning electron microscopy image of tungsten sulphide nanotube bundles.

Tungsten sulphide nanotube bundles. Photo credit: Alla Zak, Weizmann Institute of Science

As in many areas of energy storage, hydrogen fuel cell research teams are expending a lot of time and brainpower on ways to replace expensive and rare elements with more ubiquitous catalysts. Crack that and the cost of energy storage should come tumbling down.

Now a group at Rutger University in New Jersey, USA, has published results that indicate tungsten sulphide may well be able to replace super-expensive platinum in fuel cells. But this is no ordinary tungsten sulphide.
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